NMIMS Case Discussion 1 – 2018-20 Batch Prep

This topic contains 19 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Muskan Kharbanda 7 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #9828
     Abhirup Bhattacharya 
    Keymaster

    “Chief executives should be challenged for explanations and even have their pay cut if they fail to appoint women to senior positions,” said the Business Council of Australia in a letter this week to its members. The BCA, the representative body of the chief executives of Australia’s 100 largest companies, is urging its members to adopt a “checklist of reforms” aimed at addressing the underrepresentation of women in senior positions, and to consider docking CEO pay if they do not implement the reforms. In Australia, women have been outpacing men in earning college degrees since 1985 and make up 46% of the workforce, but hold only 16% of board positions and 3.5% of chief executive roles. The BCA aims to double the number of women in senior positions in the next 10 years, and claims this isn’t just an equality issue, but also an economic issue: “We risk not getting the best talent for the job.” Even if we take for granted that equal opportunity for women in senior positions is a laudable goal, is tying executive compensation to the promotion of women ethically problematic in India ?

    Founder , Ideasmakemarket.com
    MBA Finance, NMIMS, Mumbai 2011-13

    #9834
     Akanksha Chaudhary 
    Participant

    Hi, In India male is to female ratio is less as compared to that of Australia and on top of that number of women in premier business and technical institutes in India is not very satisfactory.So, it is fair to say that there are less number of qualified women as compared to men. Holding a senior cotporate position in any company should be based on merit and tying executive’s salary to it would only affect the integrity of the hiring process. Represention of women should be increased for that and first  step should be to ensure that more women study from leading institues and their education is at par with their male counterparts. Government has taken quite a few steps to ensure that and this change will come gradually but putting a spearhead on ceo will not provide the desired results.

    #9835
     Abhirup Bhattacharya 
    Keymaster

    Hi, In India male is to female ratio is less as compared to that of Australia and on top of that number of women in premier business and technical institutes in India is not very satisfactory.So, it is fair to say that there are less number of qualified women as compared to men. Holding a senior cotporate position in any company should be based on merit and tying executive’s salary to it would only affect the integrity of the hiring process. Represention of women should be increased for that and first step should be to ensure that more women study from leading institues and their education is at par with their male counterparts. Government has taken quite a few steps to ensure that and this change will come gradually but putting a spearhead on ceo will not provide the desired results.

    Seems you are trying to conclude in the opening itself. Also there are several other areas to look into this case. Few keywords are missing.

    Founder , Ideasmakemarket.com
    MBA Finance, NMIMS, Mumbai 2011-13

    #9837
     parul singla 
    Participant

    hello friends

    The case given to us aims at increasing women workforce to senoir positions like CEO and directors of the company.BCA is urging its members to adopt a check list of reforms otherwise there will be cut it CEOs pay.BCA wants to double the number of woman in senior positions but it would be unethical if we tie executive compensation to promotion of woman.Also BCA should not  have a pay cut instead they should create more and more awareness about the importance of education and convince its members for promoting gender equality . IF there will be pay cut, executives will do it by fear not because of  gender equality.In a country like india, gender inequality has always been a major issue,starting from female population,to education and now to equal opportunities in the work force. ..The problem is not only about gender inequality but also an economic issue.We may not get the right candidate for the position and we may not contribute the best to the economy.Research has shown that women has been better at decision making and can be a better director than menSo acc to me equal opportunites should be given to both men and women .women has the same educational rights as that of men.Also  High positions require lots of learning,knowledge.Proper training should be given and the one that best fits the position should be selected.It should not be selected on the basis of gender.

    #9839
     Abhirup Bhattacharya 
    Keymaster

    This is a better approach. However keyword is missing. Good part is you highlighted steps of action. +3 for the approach, but there are still many areas. The case is not as direct as it seems. Well done Parul though

    Founder , Ideasmakemarket.com
    MBA Finance, NMIMS, Mumbai 2011-13

    #9840
     Priya Gupta 
    Participant

    In the case being discussed, it is important to notice that while the participation of women in workforce in 46% in Australia, it is lower than 1/3rd of that in India. So tying the executive compensation to the promotion of women is unethical in India. Factors like merit and skills should decide the role of a person rather than the gender.

    Steps which should be taken –

    1. It is important to address the issues of gender-based discrimination in employment, promotion, unequal-pay, sexual harassment etc so as to retain the female workforce. I think the presence of an unconscious bias to see role of a man as “leading” and that of woman as “supportive” should be eliminated. Organizations can take the example of companies like Google, which is tackling such issues by making the employees to undergo internal training programmes.

    1. Schemes like Pradhan Mantri Shiksha Yojana, Skill India Programme should be properly implemented because only when literacy and emply-ability of women will increase, the ratio of workforce will be balanced.

     

    #9852
     Abhirup Bhattacharya 
    Keymaster

    Good approach Prachi. Liked the examples given +4. Loved the angle of ethics being brought up

    Founder , Ideasmakemarket.com
    MBA Finance, NMIMS, Mumbai 2011-13

    #9857
     Aafreen Khan 
    Participant

    We see that the numbers regarding Australia’s workforce suggest that women are being treated unfairly when it comes to promotions. Some steps to address the issue are needed. However, introducing pay cuts is an extreme measure and it may lead to further problems. Promotions need to be gender-neutral and not in favour of either males or females. CEOs should be held accountable but not coerced. More transparency in the promotion process is one solution.

    Having said that, we now need to take into account the social differences between India and Australia. Not only does India have a low sex ratio, there is also a significant gap between male and female literacy rates. Our literate female population is low. Among the literate women, those who pursue higher education and undertake corporate jobs are even fewer.

    India needs structural reforms and schemes to promote literacy among its population, especially women. Our government is working towards it.

    Tying executive compensation to the promotion of women is in itself ethically problematic. Also, India’s corporate dynamics are not comparable to that of Australia’s. It’s premature to introduce these reforms here. However, transparency in the process of promotion is something we could undertake nonetheless.

    #9859
     Abhirup Bhattacharya 
    Keymaster

    The answer is well structured. Lacks in two areas – 1. The keyword 2. Examples of female CEOs. Overall a good start. +3

    Founder , Ideasmakemarket.com
    MBA Finance, NMIMS, Mumbai 2011-13

    #9887
     Diptarka Saha 
    Participant

    The primary stakeholders in this scenario are the BCA, the individual CEOs and the women workforce. Before arriving to a solution of the problem it must be noted that the BCA is not a profit making organization, whereas the chief objective of a CEO is to maximize revenues for his business organization. Appointing women in senior positions just because of the fear of pay cuts is ethically problematic, even more so in a country like India where there is a high gender divide between the male and female workforce.

    Tying executive compensation to the promotion of women is ethically and morally wrong, a person should be applauded and promoted irrespective of his gender, in order to achieve equality in the truest sense. CEOs should not be reprimanded if they fail to appoint women to senior positions, instead as an alternative approach to tackle the problem, they could be reprimanded if they suppress employees, especially women, from achieving senior positions. This will ensure a free and unbiased hierarchical ladder for every employee irrespective of their gender.

    Alternatively, the HR department of the company could undertake mandatory training for the workforce on issues like unequal pay, sexual harassment and gender discrimination.

    A culmination of the above alternatives could to my mind aid to the achievement of true gender equality.

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